Venice Photo Diary

Venice

Dedicating only one post to Venice is like trying to describe an entire lifetime in one day. Venice is one of the most unique places I have ever been to – and I've been to quite a few. The city was build in the 5th century on 118 small islands, and it seems to simply float on the waters of the lagoon.  

Venice

Of the many names used to described Venice, "The City of Bridges" is one of the most common. The Venetian islands are connected by over 400 bridges.

Venice

On our second day in Venice, we took a quick boat trip to Murano, a series of islands famous for the centuries-old art of glass making. {Hence, the phrase "Murano glass."} After hours of wandering in and out of boutiques adorned with the most exquisite glass handiwork, we happened upon a historical glass factory demonstration where we watched the formation of a gorgeous, one-of-a-kind glass lamp and the hard work required to make just one of these beautiful works of art. Today, to protect the original Murano glass art from foreign markets, the most famous glass factories of these islands have an official trademark, so look for it next time you think you're buying authentic Murano glass. 

Venice

Although I am not an art connoisseur by any means, I do appreciate art and am always fascinated by art history relics – treasures in which Venice is very rich. The influence of Venice on the development of architecture and the arts is undeniable. The entire city is an extraordinary architectural masterpiece in which even the smallest buildings contain works by some of the world's greatest artists such as Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese and others. The building below is the house of Italian painter Tintoretto {1518-1594}, also known as "Il Furioso" because of his phenomenal energy in painting. 

 Venice

The flower-draped window sills and balconies are a very common feature of historical buildings in not only Italy but all of Europe. It is absolutely incredible the beauty a few simple pots can add to the overall appearance of houses, streets and entire cities. I was instantly overcome with daydreams of one day living in a pink-colored Italian villa with beautiful large balconies full of flowers of every sort and color. I just may dedicate an entire post to European balconies in the near future.

Venice 

Views of the historic city center greeted us as our cruise ship arrived in port. 

Venice

Here we have more cotton-candy buildings, flowery balconies, and trattorias {meaning an Italian-style eating establishment, less formal than a restaurant.}

Venice

Needless to say, Venice is full of charming surprises, like this "Arrivederci" sign over an alleyway. 

Venice

Between the brick alleys of Murano, the ancient art of glass blowing continues much as it did hundreds of years ago.

Venice

Built at the beginning of the 17th century, the Bridge of Sighs {seen above} links Doge's Palace to a prison. Legend has it that prisoners crossing the bridge would sigh in despair at seeing the city's lagoon for the last time. Hence, the name. The infamous Latin lover Casanova walked the bridge in 1755. He was arrested but managed to escape the confines of the prison 15 months later – with the help of a monk.

 Venice

One of my favorite experiences was wandering through parts of town typical tourists simply skip over. Wherever I travel, I am always curious to see locals living everyday life. The freshly washed laundry swaying in the breeze, smells of Italian cuisine wafting out of open windows, Italian bambini playing in the alleys – all these seemingly cliche details evoke the old-world charm of another world, one that is undisturbed by modern conveniences. 

Venice

Besides being filled with tourists and breathtaking architecture, St. Mark's Square is also full of pigeons. The city recently passed a law that banned the feeding of these birds; however, most tourists seem to be oblivious to said law.

Venice 

The Redentore Church on La Giudecca is a 16th century Roman Catholic church, designed by Andrea Palladio and built as a votive church to thank God for the deliverance of the city from a major outbreak of the plague. 

Venice

On our day trip to Murano, we came across a series of remarkable large-scale glass sculptures, one of which you can slightly see in the center of the photo. Designed by Simone Cenedese, this incredibly work of art is called "Blue Comet." 

Venice

St. Mark's Basilica is considered one of the world's best examples of Byzantine architecture. 

Venice

St. Mark's Basilica is known for its opulent design and gilded interior mosaics and is nicknames Chiesa d'Oro, meaning "Church of Gold."

Venice

Venice is sometimes called "The City of Canals" because of its 177 canals.

Venice

Currently, cruise ships like the one we were on pass within 1,000 feet of St. Mark's Square, granting a stunning view to those aboard the ship.

Venice

However, as of November 1, 2014, ships larger than 96,000 tons, with a capacity of 3,000 to 3,500 passengers, will be banned from Venice. So obviously my advice to you is to book a cruise before November. It truly is one of – if not the most – economical ways to travel Europe. For more reasons to book a cruise, visit one of my earlier posts

Venice

Charming details, like this moss-covered building or the teal-colored lamp-post, can be found around every corner.

Venice

Again, I simply cannot resist taking photos of Italian balconies. They are truly a work of art.

 Venice 

St. Mark's Square Campanile, or bell tower, stands 324 feet tall and offers what I'm sure is a breathtaking view as far as the Alps. Seeing how we had already been to the Alps, and seen the incredible views from there, we decided to save a little cash and forgo the ascent.The tower has been the inspiration for several other copies across Europe and North America, including the Metlife Tower in New York, the Sather Tower in California, and the Venetian Towers at the Plaça d'Espanya in Barcelona.

 Venice

St. Mark's Square boasts some of the most elite and high-end shops and restaurants you can possibly imagine. The restaurants offer live orchestra music while a suave Italian waiter dressed in a white dinner jacket and bow tie takes care of your every whim. Or you can forgo the pompous activities and simply sit on the steps of the shops, watching the ignorant tourists feed the pigeons.

Venice

Of course I could not resist including another photo of Italian balconies. Ladies and gents, this is the stuff my Italian daydreams are made of. 

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2 Comments

  1. Pingback: One Room Challenge, Week 2: Living Room Inspiration + Design Plan

  2. I love your pictures beautiful:) Venice is unique, eachtime I visit Venice it feels like the first time so magical so romantic !!!

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